Reasons to Keep a Child Home

I’m here!  Count me!  Attendance Matters!  

Being in school every day is critical for children’s well-being, engagement and learning.

Students should attend school when:

  • They are generally healthy and well.

  • They are participating in their usual daily activities.

If your child has difficulty attending school on a regular basis, please contact your student’s teacher, the school social worker, the school nurse, or the school office to discuss the situation and identify strategies to help your child attend school.

Reasons to keep a child home (see the chart below for specific symptoms):  

What are my child’s symptoms?

When should a child stay home? (not attend school)

When should a child seek medical attention?

When can a child return to school?

Fever

A fever of 100.4°F (38°C) or higher.

If you have a fever and other symptoms like a sore throat, rash, stomach ache, vomiting, diarrhea, headache or other pain.

You can return to school when you are fever free for 24 hours without fever reducing medication.  

Vomiting

Any episodes of vomiting.

When vomiting continues for a 24 hour period because you are at risk for dehydration.

You can return to school if you have not vomited for 24 hours and are eating and drinking,

Diarrhea

You have 3 or more loose/watery/runny stools in one day.

When diarrhea continues for a 24 hour period because you are at risk for dehydration.

You can return to school if you have not had diarrhea for 24 hours and are eating and drinking.

Persistent Cough

Recurring coughs that disrupts daily activity or could limit the students ability to focus on learning.

If you have a persistent cough, with difficulty breathing, trouble catching your breath, or a fever.

You can return to school when your cough does not disrupt your activity or ability to focus on learning.  If you have asthma please contact your school nurse.

Difficulty breathing

If difficulty breathing disrupts your daily activity or could limit the students ability to focus on learning. 

See your doctor promptly for difficulty breathing that does not resolve immediately with decrease in activity and rest.

You can return to school when your breathing returns to normal and does not disrupt your activity or ability to focus on learning.  If you have asthma or another respiratory diagnosis please contact your school nurse.

What are my child’s symptoms?

When should a child stay home? (not attend school)

When should a child seek medical attention?

When can a child return to school?

Head Injury or Concussion

If you have a headache, light sensitivity and/or sensitivity to noise/sounds, or other symptoms after a head injury..

Seek emergency services for nausea, vomiting, slurred speech, hard to awaken, change in mental abilities or other concerns after a head injury.  See your healthcare provider for symptoms such as headache, sensitivity to light and sound, increased fatigue, “not feeling right”, feeling foggy, or any other complaints after a head injury..

You can return to school as directed by your healthcare provider or when symptoms improve.  Please contact your school nurse for support returning to school after a concussion.

Sore throat

If your throat is sore and  you have a fever or other symptoms.

If you have noted white patches, drooling, trouble swallowing, fever or a rash.

You can return to school once you feel better or as directed by your healthcare provider.  If you are taking a prescription antibiotic you can return 24 hours after the first dose.

Rash

Any rash with an unknown cause.

When a rash is of unknown cause and causes fever or behavioral changes.

You can return to school when the rash has resolved or as directed by a healthcare provider..

Eye Irritation

Eye pain, with redness and drainage 

See your doctor promptly for eye swelling, eye pain, drainage that happens throughout the day, trouble seeing, or an eye injury.

You can return to school once the eye is feeling better or as directed by a healthcare provider

Prescription Antibiotics

 

 

If you are taking a prescription antibiotic you can return to school 24 hours after the first dose, with symptom improvement and fever free for 24 hours without fever reducing medication.